Gift is a transfer of ownership in exchange for love and affection. Such transfer, in the case of immoveable property of the value of one hundred rupees and upwards, or in the case of a reversion or other, can be made only by a registered instrument. Delivery of tangible immoveable property takes place when the seller places the buyer, or such person as he directs, in possession of the property.

[“Documents required for gift deed”]
• Identity Proof of donor and donee and witnesses.
• Residence Proof of donor and donee and witnesses.
• Ownership proof of property
• No due certificate for urban property.
• No objection certificate for urban property.
• Two passport size photographs of donor and donee.
• Valueation report from archetect (original)
• Power of attorney/special power of attorney/authority letter/resulation(if applicable)

Stamp duty, Registration Fee, Computer Fee, Pasting Fee in Punjab:-

i. Stamp duty for urban property :- For women beneficiary : 6% of Collector rate For Men : 6%
Joint: 6%
Registration Fee: 2.25% of Collector rate
Computer fee: 1 lac to 10 lac value : Rs. 1,000/-
Above 10 lac to 30 lac : Rs. 3,000/-
Above 30 lac : Rs. 5,000/-
Pasting Fee (Per document) : Rs. 100/-

ii. Stamp duty for rular property :- For women beneficiary: 6% of Collector rate
For Men : 6%
Joint : 6%
Registration fee: 2.25% of Collector rate
Computer fee: 1 lac to 10 lac value : Rs. 1,000/-
Above 10 lac to 30 lac : Rs. 3,000/-
Above 30 lac : Rs. 5,000/-
Pasting Fee : Rs. 100/-
Mutation fee :Rs. 300/-

The process of registration of documents plays an important role in generating revenue for the Government. Registration means recording the contents of a document with a Registering Officer and preserving the copies of original documents. The documents are registered for the purpose of conservation of evidence, assurance of title, publicity and prevention of fraud. The Registration process encompasses sub-functions such as receipt generation, valuation, and recovery of evaded stamp duty, refund of excess stamp duty, adjudication and issuing notices. Also, registration helps an intending beneficiary to know if the title deeds of a particular property have been deposited with any person or financial institution for the purpose of obtaining an advance against the security of that property.

Documents relating to transactions of immovable property are required to be compulsorily registered. Payment of requisite stamp duty completes the registration of documents. It is a type of tax that is paid for the transaction performed by way of document or instrument under provisions of the Indian Stamp Act, 1899. It is payable on instruments and not on transactions. The payment of proper stamp duty on instruments bestows legality on them. Such instruments get evidentiary value and are admitted in evidence in courts of law.
The stamps have to be purchased in the name of one of the executors to the instrument. Registration Act, 1908 Registration of documents is done under provisions of the Registration Act, 1908. The main purpose of designing the Act was to ensure information about all deals concerning land, so that correct land records could be maintained. The Act is used for proper recording of transactions relating to other immovable property also.

registration of gift deed is compulsory.-(I) The documents gift deed shall be registered, if the property to which they relate is situate in a district in which, and if they have been executed on or after the date on which, Act XVI of 1864, or the Indian Registration Act, 1866, or the Indian Registration Act, 1871, or the Indian Registration Act, 1877, or this Act came or comes into force, namely,- (a) Instruments of gift of immovable property; Registration Act, 1877, or this Act came or comes into force, namely,- (b) other non-testamentary instruments which purport or operate to create, declare, assign, limit or extinguish, whether in present or in future, any right, title or interest, whether vested or contingent, of the value of one hundred rupees and upwards, to or in immovable property;

“Gift” defined.-“Gift” is the transfer of certain existing moveable or immoveable property made voluntarily and without consideration, by one person, called the donor, to another, called the donee, and accepted by or on behalf of the donee. Acceptance when to be made, Such acceptance must be made during the lifetime of the donor and while he is still capable of giving. If the donee dies before acceptance, the gift is void.

123. Transfer how effected.-For the purpose of making a gift of immoveable property, the transfer must be effected by a registered instrument signed by or on behalf of the donor, and attested by at least two witnesses.
For the purpose of making a gift of moveable property, the transfer may be effected either by a registered instrument signed as aforesaid or by delivery.
Such delivery may be made in the same way as goods sold may be delivered.

Under section 123 of the Transfer of Property Act, a gift of immoveable property cannot pass any title to the donee if it is not registered. Any oral gift of immoveable property cannot be made in view of the provision of section 123 of the Act, mere delivery of possession without written instrument cannot confer any title.
When gift may be suspended or revoked.-The donor and donee may agree that on the happening of any specified event which does not depend on the will of the donor a gift shall be suspended or revoked; but a gift which the parties agree shall be revocable wholly or in part, at the mere will of the donor, is void wholly or in part, as the case may be.